incandescent installations – The Company & The Matrix

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design, installation, sculpture

Like ping-pong balls and bicycles, the humble lightbulb is another example of everyday items being used to make striking installation. The above, made from 76 tunsgten lamps suspended from a catenary arch and entitled The Company, is a sound reactive light installation that was commissioned for the Bring To Light festival in Brooklyn (October 2011). Designed by London-based creative coder Andrea Cuius and designer Roland Ellis, The Company is a multi-sensory environment that is intended to bring a sense of atmosphere to the architectural space that was once a traditionally industrial icon.

Andrea Cuius and Roland Ellis, The Company (2011), 76 tungsten lamps

Through customised software, the installation plays sounds that are adapted live according to inputs from the environment. Audio input from the external environment modifies the sound and light behaviour of the installation. Whoa. Check it out in action below:

And how about this light sculpture by Kianoosh Motallebi? Entitled The Matrix, it consists of an incandescent lamp fused with a fluorescent light, two contrasting sources of light that appear to be feeding off one another.

Kianoosh Motallebi, The Matrix (2010)

‘The two otherwise incompatible technologies are forced to operate in the same space, creating a dynamic system that ultimately leads to dysfunction of both light sources,’ Motallebi explains.

‘Nuff of the science chat. Aren’t these works beautiful? They have an otherwordly feel, powered by modern technology yet strangely alien when removed from their functional realm.

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Blogging about art, architecture and design that tickle my fancy.

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